TGIF! – Not in the world of FTD…….

So, Friday has rolled around again. The weeks go by so quickly, it’s hard to keep up sometimes. When you’re floundering around in the quagmire of FTD, one day flows into the next, with little difference between Tuesday and the weekend. So, just like the Dowager Countess from “Downton Abbey” you don’t even really know what a weekend is anymore. Of course, her excuse was that she had never worked her whole life, so there was no reason for a division between the days of the week. For you, living with someone who doesn’t even know what day of the week it is, will make you feel that it is irrelevant too.

Time is often irrelevant in our FTD world. It is meaningless to our FTD’ers, and our own timekeeping is reduced to when the next meal/diaper change/toileting rendezvous is to take place. Even though I continued to work outside the home when I was caring for my husband, once I was back in the safe confines of our house, my world was completely different. It was important to him to maintain his world so that he felt he had control. As the disease progressed, his control and obsessive behaviors became a lifeline for him. He clung to familiar routines and patterns because they brought him comfort. But although he would “tidy” the house, most things were not in the right place. I didn’t mind. The state of my house was never quite as important to me as the state of my husband’s mind.

Since I work in a hospital, I am well-accustomed to orderly chaos. We refer to our work as “predictably unpredictable”. All the things we love about it – the wide variety of people we meet, the multiple skills we are required to use on a daily basis, the “no-two-days-are-the-same” part are also all the things we dislike about our work. It’s an amazing dichotomy of a love-hate relationship. Of course, it’s all about control. Nurses are no different to anyone else in that regard. But our world is changing fast, and as healthcare consumers (pretty much everyone) are becoming more knowledgeable, so we must change our approach to caring for them. No longer can we say “just take this pill/do this/go here” anymore, because people ask “Why?”. I think it’s a good thing, but it’s hard for some nurses who have been around a long time. Nurse Ratchett

People should be more inquiring. People –you –should want to know everything you can about things that affect you. When it comes to FTD, you probably know more than most of the clinicians you meet. So, when it comes to trying to make sense of what has now become your new “work week”, and the trials that it brings, it is necessary to define exactly what now divides up your time.

If you still work, you may have to find a daycare center for your loved one to attend, or someone to come into your home. If you are able to stay at home, you will need to have a plan as to how you will maintain some kind of order among what will at times be chaos.  A schedule to organize and help your FTD’er to maintain some kind of control for him/herself. Holding on to dignity and a little control will go a long way to helping them to feel respected and valued. Even when they may not be able to talk well any longer, holding on to the last vestiges of something they understand and feel comfortable with will help you too. As the FTD progresses, this will become more and more important to both of you.

You can still have that Friday feeling. You may need to tailor the events of your week a little, but you can make new rituals to share –having special coffee or foods only on Saturday and Sunday, for example. A walk in the park, or going to church as long as your loved one’s behavior will permit. Just find something special that you both enjoy. When it comes to food of course, it is likely that you are going through a phase where your loved one will only eat one kind of food. And that’s ok. Give them their M&M’s or their ice cream, or whatever it is. But make sure that whatever it is they’re having, you’re having your special “Saturday treat”.

Le weekend, as the French say, has long been revered by the working classes as a special occasion. Not having to go to work for two whole days is a treat indeed. But when you care for someone at home, the pleasure of that break is denied you. When you live with someone for whom days of the week no longer has meaning, it takes a special effort to stop the days from running into one another.

To Do  Imagine having nothing to do. Nothing! I’ll bet you can barely remember what that’s like. Before FTD, lazy Sundays reading the papers in bed, strolling aimlessly, calling in at the pub. All seems like a long-forgotten dream now. Your FTD days are full. Your FTD weekends are full too. Try to make them at least a little bit full of something for you. If you can make them full of nothing by having your loved one visit someone else, even better. Spending time alone in my own house is a pleasure that  I longed for many times when in the throes of FTD. Just being alone in my own house. Heaven.

Anyone who has never had that feeling cannot even imagine the yearning to just be in your own space. Alone. It can be draining. The 24-hour vigilance. The 24/7/365 “attendance”. The constantly being on call at every hour of the day and night. We need help. Don’t ever turn it down, even if you’re feeling ok today. Because tomorrow you might be in your yearning mood again. Grab every offer with both hands and run. And don’t look back, at least for a few hours anyway. Your loved one will survive. Even if they’re upset, it won’t last long. They’ll get over it and quickly. And if the person who offered is enlightened by their experience, they may offer again. (Or not!)

Even though you know it won’t last forever, you are only human. You need to time to yourself now. I know from personal experience that there will come a time when you will be by yourself, sometimes more than you would like, even yearning for those chaotic FTD days. It’s a double-edged sword.

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