FTD –the Guilty Party

Let’s just get one thing straight. Guilt is not something people can tell you not to have. How the hell can you erase guilt? It’s an emotion over which you have no control.

“Don’t feel guilty about going for a manicure/taking some time for yourself/eating your dinner”

That’s all well and good, but one voice in your shoulder says “Yes! You deserve it!. Go ahead and do something for you for a change”. The other voice says “What? You’re doing something for yourself? Are you kidding me? You’re a caregiver, for God’s sake. What about him/her? Come on, you shouldn’t be doing that. You’ve got (substitute any caregiving task here) to do”.

Angel and devil

So clearly, telling you not to feel guilty isn’t going to work is it? One half of you wants to do what you want to do, because, well, you haven’t done that in a long, long time. The anger and resentment feeds  the part of you that needs, yes needs, something dammit. The other half, the rational side, wants you to do what you do for the other twenty-three hours a day/seven days a week. The stuff that you do for other people. Because let’s not kid ourselves here. You don’t just take care of your FTD’er. Oh no, you feel it necessary to take care of the rest of your family too. Granted if you have small children or teens, then you have to somehow figure out how to give them time and what they need too. But if you have no children or they are grown and gone, then they and your other relatives and friends need to figure out for themselves how they are handling this issue of FTD

Sure, you can help them to understand what is happening and help them to come to terms with it. But you can’t do it for them. They have to figure that out for themselves. That’s where the guilt comes in. You feel guilty about not being able to make it right for everyone else. You feel guilty that you can’t fix your husband/wife/friend/partner. You feel guilty -well, just because. There doesn’t need to be a reason. People can try to make you feel guilty. But actually only you can allow that to happen. You can explain till you’re blue in the face what’s going on. But at the end of the day, the guilt can either break you, or lead you to a way of thinking that will make you a little more free.

Accepting that the guilt belongs to someone else and not to you is a breakthrough. If you can reach that understanding, your life with FTD may be a little less fraught. A little less heavy. Because guilt certainly is a heavy burden, that’s for sure. It can make you yield to suggestions or actions that you don’t really think are right. But pressure from other people can do funny things to you. The heaviest pressure of all is from yourself. Your expectations of how you think you will manage the bastard disease will never come to fruition.

FTD is cunning and clever. It can give you delusions about your abilities. It can make you doubt yourself a thousand times a day. But guilt? Guilt is one of the jewels in the crown of the bastard disease. Jewel in the crown

FTD, while affecting the mind of your love one, will do its best to guilt you into becoming a cooperative partner in its dirty deeds. It will try to take your independent thoughts and replace them with FTD-centric ones. It will scream “Me, me!” and guilt you into not going to the wedding/party/spa/vacation. just so you can spend more time acceding to its every demand. It’s not your loved one making the demands, it’s the bastard disease.

I can now see how guilty I felt every minute of every day. Every time I enjoyed something my husband would have enjoyed. Every time I held our grandchildren. Every time I watched a movie that I know he would have liked, or laughed at or cried at. I felt guilty, but now I see it was because I was afraid. Afraid of what I knew was to come. Enjoying things without him, living without him.

Of all terminal diseases, FTD can be one of the most cruel. For so long, there seems to be little that has changed. Then one day, you have to remind someone how to put their pants on one leg at a time. You have to order their food in a restaurant because they can’t get their tongue around the words. You have to buy adult diapers for your 45-year old husband/wife. You have to hide the car keys. Guilt blossoms because you feel like it is you that is taking everything away. You that is depriving your loved one of whatever it is.

It’s not you. Just like the behaviors and the speech problems and the mobility issues are not your loved one, they are not you either. The bastard disease, while chipping away at the brain, likes to chip away at yours a little too. Whittling away at your resolve and strength. Piling on the guilt, as if it’s all your fault. Well I’m here to tell you that it’s not. Can you control guilty feelings? No. But maybe you can accept them. Maybe you can see them for what they really are. Feelings. Guilt is only one of a myriad of emotions that you are experiencing as you travel this FTD journey. I can’t tell you not to feel it. Even if I did, you couldn’t. But maybe you can keep it subdued. Maybe you can let other feelings override it a little. Feelings like pleasure, comfort, sadness, anger. It’s not easy.

I talk a good fight, but I felt guilt too. Guilt about “therapeutic fibs. Guilt about taking away the car keys, money and all kinds of independence which had become dangerous to my husband. Guilt about placing my husband in residential care. Guilt about going out to a nice dinner, or the theater or a trip. I couldn’t not feel it. But I found a way around it. A way that allowed me to say “I deserve it”. You do too. But no amount of me telling you that will work. You have to be able to tell yourself that. You do deserve it. Really.

 Spa

“The Dance” – a memoir of FTD

Today I am excited to announce that my book – “The Dance” is very close to its publication date. It has been a labor of love for the last two years. If you are dealing with FTD, our story is probably not that much different to yours, but I hope that it will throw some light on the topic of FTD for those who may not be familiar with the bastard disease.

It was a journey, that’s for sure. A rocky road of pain and heartache with a few laughs thrown in along the way. Well, more than a few actually.

I know my husband would be very proud of me for sharing our story with you. He was always my toughest critic, but in the nicest possible way. I am very proud of it too. Not just because it’s about us, but because the writing of it was so cathartic. Sometimes, the constant editing and rewriting seemed arduous. Re-reading such painful experiences was almost masochistic. I referred to the many journals I had kept over a five year period. Sometimes I even shocked myself with the things I had written and forgotten about.

I hadn’t forgotten about the pain of course. That’s still around. But I have a handle on it now. Can keep it subdued so it doesn’t come back and bite me in the ass, as it is wont to do. It still does sometimes though. When I’m driving and a song comes on that reminds me of him or a time we shared.

I have learned a lot in the last seven years. Everyone does of course. We have to learn in order to survive this mortal coil. I know I’ve learned one thing for sure –you never know enough.

Anyway, just wanted to share my news. I hope you will consider reading our story. It will be available on Amazon in paperback and a Kindle version very soon.

Thank you for following my blog, it means a lot to me that anyone is prepared to listen to my “tell-it-like-it-is” babbling. I appreciate your indulgence 🙂

frontcover

 

 

Resolution

Stirring words. So true, so raw. Great job Jeremy Farmer – the Boy Poet!

The Boy Poet

Resolution

Anger and rage burn,
burn inside, eating away at the senses
until common sense is all but forgotten
and flames ignite the pain of hurt feelings
lost feelings
alone
unwanted
as the thoughts invade
and words cut deeper than any knife.

Silence
as no words cut even deeper
irritating raw senses
like salt on an open wound
as thoughts imagine without evidence
the hand that embraced love
is holding another heart.

Yet senses calm in the serenity of time
equilibrium returns
and unvoiced thoughts wither in a kiss
a kiss
the strength that is love
enduring love
that survives disagreement.

© JG Farmer 2014

Form: Free Verse

Copyrighted.com Registered & Protected  0YZI-XNQT-K70S-OMQH

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FTD – Disrespectful in the Extreme

hand kissing

I have been reading and listening to those caregivers who are finding it so very difficult to relinquish the grasp on their long relationships. FTD certainly takes its toll on those.

It’s tough, I know. You live with someone for thirty, forty years and, if there is love, there is some degree of respect. Respect for the person. Not just the outer being that everyone sees, but for the true inner soul that you met, fell in love with and spent at least half of your life with. We have respect in varying degrees for a variety of people in our lives. Parents, teachers, any kind of authority. This is what we are taught if we have good parents and role models. At various points in our lives, we challenge the authority, but in general, we come back around to believing that anarchy just won’t work for us. You can be a hell-raiser for a while, but most people follow a path that holds other people in esteem and tolerates human frailties.

The respect within a loving couple –that indefinable desire to please and honor the other’s wishes and needs –that is a whole different ball game. It begins in the early stages of a relationship when you realize that this person likes you, loves you even, for exactly who you are. Not because they’re your mother, father, sister, brother etc. Not because they have to. Well, they kind of do if they’re your family -right?

This new person that you met, they like you because they think you’re funny, kind, generous, hot. Especially hot if you’re in the throes of teenager/early twenties-hood. Not that hot goes away, just gets replaced by an understanding that it’s not the most important thing. Anyway, respect. Respect is built over the years as you go through triumphs and tragedies together. It is founded on love, bolstered by familiarity and chipped away at sometimes by behavior.

holding hands

And there’s the rub. Once the behaviors of FTD kick in, that’s when the challenge begins. The respect you built over all those years is stood up to by FTD. The bastard disease is no respecter of anything really. Your love, your strength, your once-held firm beliefs that you could stand together and conquer anything.

FTD respects nothing. Not your heart, love, home or family. The respect that you hold so dear is now so severely tested that you will need to find new ways of holding on to those ideals and values that you have built over the years.

  • Stop trying to handle things the same way as you have all your life together. Your joint life is somewhat over. Face it. Your joint life, bank accounts, tax returns, trips, dinners. Joint anything is now so changed beyond recognition that you have to face up to the fact that you are doing this alone. You may have family and friends, but the two of you? That’s done.
  • There will be a time, in the early stages, when you can get your ducks in a row, have your loved one sign advance directives as to their wishes, get your other household affairs in order and so on. But as the bastard disease does its heinous work, you will start to notice that your loved one still thinks that they are capable of making those decisions with you. They’re not. Don’t kid yourself.
  • The decisions you make will be based on what they told you during those early stages. Those times when you sat and cried together about what was to come. Those times when you were in disbelief about the hand you had been dealt. The times when you respected your loved one’s opinions, choices and decisions. Because you always had.
  • The time comes when you have to use that knowledge to guide you through the middle and late stages. And that’s painful. Because you respect them. Or rather, you respect the person they once were and the decisions they did, or would have made. Painful because you don’t want to do it alone. But alone you are, and alone you will decide. You will respect what they wanted. I had a very supportive network around me, family, friends, coworkers, medical professionals. They all respected my decisions because I was very clear about what my husband and I wanted. But I still felt alone.
  • The one person you have always relied upon to support and guide you through life’s bumps can no longer help you. But you still respect them. You still need their input. It is very hard to put that aside and make the leap yourself.
  • Stop asking their permission. They can’t choose anymore. They will say no to just about everything – day care, home caregivers, travel plans, clothing and food choices. Sometimes it seems they say no just for the hell of it. So, don’t ask, tell.
  • Respect their dignity, humanity, personhood. But not their decisions. Five-year-old husbands or wives rarely make good choices for themselves. Drinking, driving, risky behaviors. Reserve the respect for the person you knew. the person you love, but not the choices they try to insist upon.
  • Stop second-guessing yourself. You’ll do the right thing. Good old FTD will make your loved one tell you you’re a bitch/bastard, you’re ugly, you don’t care, you’re having an affair, you’re withholding money/food/pleasure from them. They will spend your money, crash your car, upset the neighbors (who cares about that?). They might even try to divorce you, sell your house, grope a friend, try illegal drugs. They’re not them anymore remember? Don’t sweat it. The FTD would like you to give it everything and then some. It’s already taking everything you hold dear, so don’t give it respect, save that for your loved one’s pride and dignity.
  • Respect yourself. That’s one of the biggest accomplishments you can make in the FTD typhoon.

I respect that you are making this journey. I respect that each of us is unique, our situations similar but different. I respect the differences and make no judgment as to what is right for you. Respect yourself as a wife, husband, father, mother, partner,friend. Respect yourself as a human being with flaws and an identity. Respect your loved one as the focus of what you do but not what or who you are.

Respect yourself.