FTD – Bringing New Horizons

Lounging lady

Since becoming a lady of leisure recently (hah!) I have been tackling some projects around my house. Just small things that I didn’t have time to finish (or the inclination when working 50 hours a week) following the big renovation last year.

One of the things I noticed while painting, sanding and stenciling, was that if I made a small mistake, or got paint somewhere it shouldn’t be (mostly on me), it didn’t matter. Doing a half-assed job really didn’t matter. As long as it looks mainly ok, that’s alright. That’s something new for me. It began while caring for my husband at home. Standards of housework, appearance and status became a poor second to ensuring that my darling hubs had what he needed and was safe and comfortable,

Treading the FTD path brings out things in you that you didn’t know were there, but more importantly it puts things into perspective. When I lost my job, I went through a myriad of emotions, mostly because that place had been one of my sources of support through the FTD years and now it’s no longer available to me. I am banished. But what was eventually revealed to me over the last few weeks is that the job is not who I am, it’s what I did. That’s a little contradictory to what I have preached throughout my nursing career. I used to always say that nursing is not what you do, it’s who you are. The ability to empathize, bear the pain of others and make compassion a daily practice comes from inside. It is who you grew into as an adult, not what you were taught in school. So, although I am a nurse at heart and I have those necessary qualities, the place I demonstrate them is not really important. When the banishment happened, I told everyone – “Don’t worry, I’ll be fine, it’s not the worst thing that’s ever happened to me”.

And that is true – it’s not. FTD trampling over my love and my life was definitely the worst thing that ever happened, and I survived that. I am still here to tell the tale and hopefully, help others to weather the storm that FTD throws at us.

Learning to adapt and compromise is one of the basic tenets of handling FTD. I wrote about acceptance and resilience here, discussing how important you are in this whole equation. This thing has invaded your life and, despite its best attempts, you are more than capable of pushing back. Lately, I have become more involved in local attempts to influence legislation around dementia support. It’s a huge task and it will take many people and longer than any of us would like to influence progress. But I have the luxury now of fighting for others. I can fight FTD on a different front. You are in the trenches, fighting hard to maintain some kind of quality of life for you and your family. That’s hard. Harder than anything you will ever do. That’s why I think I can now afford to be half-assed about stuff. Because my priorities have changed. I know that the stencil on my laundry room floor is not as important as finding my husband a safe place to live when I couldn’t take care of him anymore. I know that if the paint dripped on my patio pavers is cleaned up less-than-perfectly, my life will not fall apart. I know that as lucrative and comfortable my high-flying job was, it was not the definition of me. 

Now, I am more likely to have a pet-friendly sofa, a grandchild-demolished bathroom and days without make up or showers. But it’s because I am calling the shots, not FTD.

My new work involves advocating for others and helping them to navigate the complexities of our funky healthcare system. Not that I know everything about those things of course, but I hope to bring some relief to people struggling to find their way through the FTD  maze. I hope that, in time, such advocacy for those of us who are otherwise occupied with FTD and its dubious charms, becomes mainstream and not just for those who can afford it. It is my hope that the healthcare system will wake up to the dementia tsunami that is upon us, sooner rather than later, but like most things in government, the wheels “grind exceeding slow” to quote our old friend Euripides, who was actually speaking of the ways the gods work, but you get my drift. In the meantime, I will do my best to advocate, navigate and support those I can to weather the storm and come out the other side as I did. If one person’s journey is a little easier for a little time, then I will consider myself successful. And I won’t do a half-assed job of that, believe me.

map and compass

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s