FTD – You deserve it!

No, of course I don’t mean you deserve to have or deal with FTD.

No one deserves the misery that is wrought when the bastard disease comes a-knockin’ at your door. But you deserve the truth. FTD will steal your life. It will steal your loved one’s mental being and by doing so, take away all that you hold dear.

Speaking of what we deserve, it has been some time since I was in the thick of dealing with FTD. Two years in fact. But in the last two years, and for about two years before that, I over-indulged myself to try and combat the horrible feelings and emotions that FTD generated in me. Over-indulged not with food or alcohol, but things. Like having more things would somehow make me feel better. Shopping and indulging myself. Buying “something nice” for myself because my husband could no longer do that for me. There was a sense of entitlement -“you’re going through a rough time”, “treat yourself”, take care of yourself”. It was all ok. If your husband/wife/partner/friend/parent is mean to you because of their FTD, you have the right to eat/shop/spa/pediwhatever.

At least that was what I thought then. It continues, but I am getting better. shopping

I think twice now about buying things I don’t really need. Even begrudge paying money for things. It got to the stage where i would be shopping and I couldn’t even think of something to buy that I didn’t already have. How ridiculous is that? Not that I am a millionaire or anything. I only bought things I could afford. I wear all the clothes and shoes -honestly! I didn’t go into debt to buy things. 

The “deserving” even extended to my behavior. I felt like my irritability, or thoughtlessness, or sharp tongue would be excused by the fact that I deserved sympathy because of what happened to us. I was wrong. No one that I behaved that way towards deserved it. There are no excuses. I’m sorry.

But I do feel that in the midst of the crisis, you deserve a little leeway.

You deserve whatever smidgen of a smile that someone or something throws your way. Grasp it with both hands and hold on for dear life. It has been said that we cannot let each case of FTD take two lives – the one who has it and the  one who manages it. It will wear you down. you deserve better than that. Your loved one does too, but their needs are different now. You on the other hand, have to somehow maintain some kind of a life. Some kind of sanity amidst the maelstrom. It’s easy to get sucked in to the daily drama. The everyday battle between what you used to do and what is considered ‘normal’, and the reality that has now become your life. Constant accommodation of the needs of another is draining to say the least.

This accommodation is vital so that you can preserve some kind of order in your daily life. FTD’ers rely on habit and schedule. Sometimes they revert to old habits, but FTD has modified what they recall about their habits, so they might only partially do them in the same way, or do them completely differently. An example of this would be when my husband insisted on continuing to “maintain” (and I use the term loosely) our pool and yard. He had been taking care of the pool as it it were another of our children for many years. Once FTD took a good chunk of his brain, he kept the schedule but not the quality of the work. So, in order to accommodate his need to continue and maintain some kind of impression of independence and choice for him, I would let him continue his version of cleaning the pool. I would go out early on a Saturday morning while he was still sleeping and take care of the real work myself – sweeping, chemicals etc. so that he did not know I was redoing it. I would move inappropriately stored items from the kitchen cabinets and replace dirty items from the cabinets back into the dishwasher.

Another way I accommodated his dignity and independence was to surreptitiously give money to the assistant at adult day care and she would ‘pay’ my husband for his help that day, as he was leaving with me. He always thought he worked there and was helping people less fortunate than himself It gave him a sense of purpose, pride and humanity to give back in this way.

Wanting the best for everyone is not altruistic, we do all really deserve the best we can give and receive. I’m not talking about designer handbags or Mercedes-Benz here. Just the peace of mind that letting go of what we have previously considered our just deserts brings. We all deserve that. Accepting what is and relaxing about chores not being done or your loved one wearing weird combinations of clothes (or none at all) will bring you much more of what you deserve – peace of mind.

Peace of mind is priceless in the FTD world. Letting go of the need to maintain the old status quo as far as being houseproud, appearance-centric or proud of material things pales into insignificance if you can just spend that time loving and accepting the new stats quo. Having accepted belts and ties hanging from the bedroom curtain rod and cowboy boots filled with rocks outside my backdoor, it was easier to focus on spending as much time with my husband as possible. Yes, having to redo things is exhausting, but believe me, when it’s over, you will wonder what to do with all this free time you have now.

Accommodation does not come cheap in the emotional sense of the word. It is exhausting, but it is less stressful if you place less emphasis on those things that have little or no value to an FTD’er. If you accept their standards instead of enforcing your own. Their standards are not so bad really. Well, anything involving poo is. Poo is not counted in accommodations. Just clean it up and move on would be the best advice.

Your FTD’er, as you have come to know, is not like a child to whom you can teach good behaviors. They have many years of learned habits and behaviors that are hard to break. You can teach your five-year old that it’s rude to point, or speak with their mouth full, or not interrupt. But your FTD’er? Not so much. Their capacity for learning is pretty much gone by the middle stages. Reasoning and rationalization won’t work either. They can’t do that anymore. So don’t frustrate yourself by trying to explain something.

Make a plan, do what you need to do and don’t try to explain in anything other than the simplest terms. And tell, don’t ask. Instead of “Let’s go the doctor’s/grocery store/restaurant”, tell them “We are going out in the car”. Instead of “Could you please shower/put on your coat/eat your dinner?”, tell them “Get in the shower”. Don’t ask –tell.

You deserve to have the smoothest life possible. FTD will throw every kind of wrench into your plans to divert you. Keeping things as simple as possible will give you some space to keep things moving smoothly.

You deserve to love and be loved. You deserve to have the highest quality time with your loved one as is humanly possible within the FTD environment. Don’t expect too much. Be happy with what is. And if over-indulging gets you through the dark days, so be it.

.Macy's bags

Chocolate or Macy’s, choose your poison.

indulgence2

One thought on “FTD – You deserve it!

  1. Very good description and advice. You are right, accommodation is key, finding the smoothest passage through the rapids, because there is no choice and no way round and you, at least, need to come out in one piece at the other end.

    Like

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